Wild Voices: from photographer to fracking activist, Emily Mott

Emily Mott (http://www.emilymott.com) is a photographer and environmental activist. She was educated at The Putney School, Dartmouth College and Art Center College of Design. In New York City she worked as a pastry chef and book reviewer before turning to photography. Among her clients have been Rolling Stone magazine, the New Yorker, the Telegraph, Waitrose, Ikea, British Airways and many others. In 2013 Complex.com named her as one of the 25 best travel photographers in the world.
She does pro bono photography work for Friends without Borders, Portsmouth Bangali Community Association and the Rural Refugee Network among others. She lives on a farm in West Sussex with her husband, two children, eight chickens and a cat.
Emily has also been an instrumental figure in the local activist movement to save Markwells Wood from fossil fuel exploration (https://www.markwellswoodwatch.org/).
In this conversation we cover her photography work and her approach to documenting beautiful landscapes and environmental destruction, including in Borneo. We also go into some detail about the risks that fracking poses to our countryside and environment, the planning regulations that apply to it and the tactics that Emily and her fellow activists have used in their local campaign.
You can contact Emily at emily@emilymott.com.
The Wild Voices Project podcast tells the stories of people saving nature. You can find us online at www.wildvoicesproject.org and @WildVoicesProj on twitter. And you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes and Stitcher.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s